NC750X DCT

Chat about all makes of Maxi scoot here!
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EvilRacer329
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Current Ride: Yamaha T-Max DX
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by EvilRacer329 » Thu Aug 15, 2019 10:59 am

I'm a big fan; it was my "Bike of the Year" in 2016.

Review: 2016 Honda NC750X DCT

Congrats on the new ride! Let us know what sort of fuel economy you manage...

Nick

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bugsy
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Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 3:18 pm
Current Ride: Yamaha Tmax
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by bugsy » Thu Aug 15, 2019 11:06 am

Well negotiated.

I am sure you will be pleased. I’ve been a NC 700 forum member for many years just lurking in the background. No members ever seems to have any worrying problems with the bikes, engine or the DCT.
I’m sure it’s the way to go. Economy and easy maintenance. Yes chain drive but I know you maintain things impeccably.
Just wondering about your username, may be time for a change.

By the way thank you for all your help in the past during my XMax days........

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halfabusa
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Current Ride: Honda NC750X DCT
Location: Welling, Kent
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by halfabusa » Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:03 pm

Another one joins the fold woohooo! White is a nice choice. I'm loving mine to the point that i look forward to even the most boring commutes
ImageImageImageImage

NC750X DCT
FJR1300
Burgman 400 gone
Tmax 500 Sold
Burgman 650 dead...

XMax400Paul
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by XMax400Paul » Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:41 am

bugsy wrote:
Thu Aug 15, 2019 11:06 am
...Yes chain drive but I know you maintain things impeccably....
Just wondering about your username, may be time for a change...
By the way thank you for all your help in the past during my XMax days...
Scotoiler is a consideration - any views - any owners installed them?
'DCTPaul' may be coming to the forum? - I'll see if Admin can fashion a change...
No worries on the 'help and pointers' front - Its what life and the forum is for...
halfabusa wrote:
Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:03 pm
Another one joins the fold woohooo! White is a nice choice. I'm loving mine to the point that i look forward to even the most boring commutes
Thanks - Any advice or wisdom kindly received as a response or PM - have already sounded out Funky and Phantom...
Like the look of 8k service - Its gonna be a weekend bike... but will want to do most maintenance myself - but doesn't sound like its gonna need much... dealer service at 600 and the 8k - which will prolly see out the warranty - will look to do interim oil change...

Fender Extender on Order, and a shorty 2 finger lever for the brake..
Thinking of cutting a sticky pad or rivet fitting a rubber 'crap flap' to protect the shock. had one on the R30 Supermoto from the Dual Sport Model - as muck always seems to get thrown over a hugger type protector...

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EvilRacer329
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Current Ride: Yamaha T-Max DX
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by EvilRacer329 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:10 am

I've had a fractious relationship with automatic chain oilers. If you can get them set just right they're great until you forget about the chain entirely and start neglecting maintenance, or the reservoir runs dry. Most of the time they either clog up due to rubbing on the sprocket or are set too high or too low, drying your chain out or dumping oil all over the rear wheel.

A Scottoiler couldn't be fitted to my Street Triple when I bought it, so I decided to try oiling my chains by hand for a while and see how I got on. I've never looked back.

I almost bought a BMW F800GT and did buy a T-Max, both because they didn't require me to deal with chains at all. I wish Honda would fit a belt to the NC series...

As for servicing, easy mode - valves are screw & locknut adjustment, which means you can even do valve checks yourself easily - and the cylinders are hanging right there, just move the radiator out of the way and you're good.

Nick

XMax400Paul
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by XMax400Paul » Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:28 am

EvilRacer329 wrote:
Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:10 am
...because they didn't require me to deal with chains at all. I wish Honda would fit a belt to the NC series...
You would of thought it would of been a no brainer - They are not a high power bike... and for the anticipated use... and owner
The belt affair of the likes of the F800 would of been a Major Selling Point...especially partnered with the DCT... which should in theory be kinder to the final transmission drive...

Will seriously look at belt drive conversion, for a bit of interest over the coming darker evenings...and as a potential after warranty... wonder if the F800 stuff would fit? mmmm?
Front and Rear Sprocket size / gearing comparison / chain and belt length etc.
Swing arm pivot bolt out and a jiggle to get the belt in...
Block Adjusters or tension wheel?

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EvilRacer329
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Current Ride: Yamaha T-Max DX
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by EvilRacer329 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:29 am

I've looked into it for the V-Strom, and there's a company that makes a kit for the 1000, but not the 650. It's serious work - pulleys are wider than chains, so there isn't always clearance, and you'll need spacers for wheels, new chain/belt guards...it's a whole thing.

The reason more bikes don't come with them is that belt systems are expensive compared to chains, and pulleys are much heavier than sprockets, increasing both rotational mass of the drivetrain and unsprung weight on the rear wheel. That's fine if you've got power/torque to spare or you can use clever engineering to keep weight to a minimum, but there has to be perceived market demand to justify it.

Did you know there are chain conversion kits for the T-Max?! The crap people will put up with for a couple extra horsepower at the rear wheel...

Nick

MrGrumpy
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by MrGrumpy » Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:36 am

EvilRacer329 wrote:
Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:10 am

I almost bought a BMW F800GT and did buy a T-Max, both because they didn't require me to deal with chains at all. I wish Honda would fit a belt to the NC series...

There again, I've wonder sometimes if one of the advantage of an NC750/Integra/X-ADV is that there no wretched useless rubber bands to worry about! Fit a Scottoiler and forget everything and throw the chain & sprockets away at 12k? miles for the same priced as Tmax Vee-belt approx. However, I see from your post above that these chain oiling may not be as straightforward as I imagined! Do your comments relate to the electric or Vacuum Scottoiler systems??

btw off at a tangent - how many miles are people getting before the chain & sprockets need replacing on the NC family?? I've never ever had a bike with a chain so I've no idea how long they might last (though probably a question similar to how long is a piece of string?)

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halfabusa
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by halfabusa » Fri Aug 16, 2019 9:42 am

XMax400Paul wrote:
Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:41 am

Scotoiler is a consideration - any views - any owners installed them?

Any advice or wisdom kindly received as a response or PM - have already sounded out Funky and Phantom...
Like the look of 8k service - Its gonna be a weekend bike... but will want to do most maintenance myself - but doesn't sound like its gonna need much... dealer service at 600 and the 8k - which will prolly see out the warranty - will look to do interim oil change...

Fender Extender on Order, and a shorty 2 finger lever for the brake..
Thinking of cutting a sticky pad or rivet fitting a rubber 'crap flap' to protect the shock. had one on the R30 Supermoto from the Dual Sport Model - as muck always seems to get thrown over a hugger type protector...
MrGrumpy wrote:
Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:36 am
btw off at a tangent - how many miles are people getting before the chain & sprockets need replacing on the NC family?? I've never ever had a bike with a chain so I've no idea how long they might last (though probably a question similar to how long is a piece of string?)

If i recall correctly from when I looked into this, only the most expensive scottoiler version was suitable for the DCT, something to do with having no usable vacuum or whatnot... So i decided to go with tutoro oiler which doesn't need any electronic wizardry, no drain on the battery and no wiring apart from its oil tube. It was dead easy to fit and works brilliantly for me. I average between 550-800 miles for each fillup on the reservoir depending on weather and adjustments. The kit came with 500ml oil which lasted me till recently when I bought a second bottle after about 14k miles. Mind you, the first bottle that came with the kit was a lot thinner grade for some reason and the second bottle is less runny and much darker, so this bottle is likely to last me a lot longer.

I bought mine at 6k miles and currently just over 20k miles on the odometer. I don't know if the chain was changed before I bought it or not but it had a bit of surface rust on it when I got the bike, so i assumed it was the original. 20k out of stock chain which is widely known to be made of chocolate is pretty good going i think!

Problem for me like MrGrumpy is I've not had a chain drive bike for over 15 years and can't tell between a chain that's good and one that's on its way out. That's probably also contributed to the fact that I may have used the chain oiler more than i needed at first bottle. I'm still curious about whether or not i'll notice that it needs changing before it breaks down on the road :roll:

Mine only ever gets lightweight motorway use so absent from harsh accelerations might have been another big factor on chain durability. State of oil before service time told a similar story as it was still clean as new even after 8k miles. I had the dealer service it before i bought the bike, so it had a service at 6k, then I had my mechanic service it at 14k. I'll get another service done at about 22k. I still have the rear brake pads with plenty of meat in them but front one needed changing recently. I also had a new front tyre with it. Rear is still going strong after 14k miles under me. But the rear tyre was almost new when i bought the bike and its michelin PR5.

I have tons of extras on the bike, this one has been the first one I felt the need to modify, probably a side effect of being in nc700 forum :) It already had a chain protector and a hugger when i bought it but i also bought a shock sock to go over the rear spring, a neoprene zipped thingy. I can list out other mods i have on the bike if you're interested. If you're near me, you're welcome to come and visit if you want to try some of the stuff I got. I have a selection of screens to choose from :D
ImageImageImageImage

NC750X DCT
FJR1300
Burgman 400 gone
Tmax 500 Sold
Burgman 650 dead...

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EvilRacer329
Posts: 97
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Current Ride: Yamaha T-Max DX
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Re: NC750X DCT

Post by EvilRacer329 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:30 am

Chains I can help with. :D

Two things wear in this case; your chain rollers wear, causing the chain to 'stretch', and the sprockets wear on the leading edge, becoming 'hooked'. You've got to check your chain regularly to adjust the tension - every 500 miles or so at a minimum. Your chain is out of spec once you run out of adjustment on the swingarm, and will start requiring more frequent adjustments as it nears the end of its life, but your sprockets will likely be done before then. Chains can also stretch unevenly, necessitating early replacement. Too-tight chains can damage gearboxes and limit suspension travel, loose chains can snap or hop off sprockets, jamming wheels and shredding metal and flesh alike.

Chains and sprockets wear together, and so should be replaced as a set, or the more worn item will simply wear the new hardware even faster. The front sprocket will wear most obviously first, and as it's hidden behind a sprocket cover on most bikes it can easily be missed. A good quality chain, well maintained on a modestly powerful motorcycle (<=100bhp) could last 20-25k, but an abused one might require replacement at half that mileage.

Now, can someone chime in and tell me how to check and tension the belt on my new T-Max? Belts are new and weird! :D

Nick


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